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Rapinoe says she will respect new U.S. Soccer national anthem policy

Megan Rapinoe made waves last fall as she opted to kneel during the national anthem before matches for both club and country. However, with a new U.S. Soccer policy in place, the U.S. Women’s National Team midfielder says she will respect the federation’s decision.

“It is an honor to represent the USA and all that we stand for — to be able to pull on the red, white and blue to play a game that I love,” Rapinoe said in a statement. “I will respect the new bylaw the leadership at USSF has put forward. That said, I believe we should always value the use of our voice and platform to fight for equality of every kind.”

Following NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s decision to kneel during the anthem to raise awareness for racial inequality, Rapinoe showed solidarity by kneeling prior to an NWSL match with the Seattle Reign. The protest continues for several games, not without controversy, including a pair of USWNT matches.

Rapinoe is currently rehabbing following knee surgery while the USWNT continues through the SheBelieves Cup.

30 comments
    • Anthony

      LOL…or something of the sort. That and she realized that she was supporting someone’s (Kaepernick) right to freedom speech who clearly did not think through his actions. The guy did not even vote. Granted, not voting is expressing your right to vote or not.

      Like

  • BrianK

    So someone needs to ask Rapinoe,…”if you are so disgusted with the USA,… why don’t you politely decline the invitations to play for the national team?”

    Like

    • Old School

      Bingo.

      Reminds me of the “thoughts and prayers” hashtag that goes around on Twitter after something dramatic happens. It’s just a look at how progressive/compassionate I am…(oh yea, and that dramatic event sucks too) soapbox that people have come to call: virtue signalling.

      Look no further than the lightning rod himself: Colin Kaepernick. As soon as it affects his dollars (upcoming free agency) suddenly the “cause has made progress” and he’ll now stand for the national anthem. Let’s ignore the fact that he didn’t even utilize his civic duty, freedom and right given by blood of people far braver than him and opted not to even vote.

      These catalysts are all about the spotlight and, possibly, about social discussion…but their actions (or lack thereof) prove otherwise.

      Like

    • Anthony

      You can still protest the country and still love the country. I love this country and was completely against the US going to war with Iraq in ’02 (especially since I knew 2 guys whose brothers saw active duty and I thought the link to 9/11 was bogus).

      Like

      • Anthony

        Old School,

        I was responding to when BrianK stated “So someone needs to ask Rapinoe,…”if you are so disgusted with the USA,… why don’t you politely decline the invitations to play for the national team?””

        Like

      • BrianK

        So, if you are kneeling during the national anthem,…you are protesting your country. She was kneeling during the anthem to protest how she perceives the LGBT are treated in/by the USA.

        Like

      • Old School

        She was kneeling during the anthem to protest how she perceives the LGBT are treated in/by the USA.

        Sorry, BrianK. Unfortunately, you’re highlighting the absurdity of her “protest” because that is not the reason she started or continued to kneel. Further proving it’s misguided irrelevance as anything but a “look at me” action by Rapinoe.

        Like

      • whammmm

        Old school you may be right but I don’t think its fair for you to assume why she knelt or how she really feels. You can’t possibly know that.

        Liked by 1 person

      • BrianK

        Old School,

        ESPNW:

        “She has described as a gesture of solidarity with San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick and others protesting social inequalities.”

        “But the 31-year-old has been equally visible in using the platform of the national team to address off-field issues. A longtime advocate for LGBT rights, she also is one of five players named in an equal-pay complaint filed against U.S. Soccer and was a vocal critic of the artificial turf used during the 2015 World Cup.”

        Be my guest and pick your favorite in the list of “social inequalities.” Supporting Kaepernick is laughable,…the dude couldn’t be bothered to vote!

        Any,…if she wants to protest,…she should decline invitations to play for the national team. She waffled,…so maybe it is a “look at me” stunt.

        Like

    • Quit Whining About Soccer in the US

      BrianK

      So Rapinoe, instead of trying to bring about change. Should quit her job?
      That is your solution?
      NOT play for the nation she loves so much that she is trying to change it for the better.

      Really well thought out.

      Still sitting in Seattle.

      Liked by 1 person

      • whammmm

        Her job is playing winger for the Reign. While she may get paid for her contributions to the NATIONAL team it is a privilege and choice, not a job. Bring attention in whatever fashion you feel but if you won’t respect the anthem of the team you are representing you shouldn’t be there.

        Like

      • BrianK

        Whammm,…thank you very much. There is some common sense and clarity of thought out there after all.

        Quit Whining about soccer,…???

        Like

    • Anthony

      Stay classy, winner. People are allowed to disagree. She’s allowed to say what she wants. However, a private employer (or sorts — like US Soccer) is allowed to impose rules about decorum or behavior of its employees. She protested – her right and they changed their rules to limit that — their right. Technically, US Soccer is not a government organization (nor funded by the government) .

      Liked by 1 person

      • BrianK

        That is correct,…but why the hypocrisy. Why not decline the invitation to play for the national team? Clearly, she ‘wants her cake and eat it too.’

        Like

      • Anthony

        There is nothing hypocritical about pointing what you think is wrong about the country you love, but still love it.

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      • Scott e Dio93

        Former Honor Guard <

        What this cow point? She makes the same sense as Westboro Baptist Church.

        Like

  • Gary Page

    I’m a veteran and worked in public service for a good part of my life. Studied government and US history up the ying yang. I see a lot of people who want to show how patriotic they are, but don’t really do sheet for the country or their fellow citizens. But they fly their flag proudly, often incorrectly, too. Quite frankly, I don’t care about all the flag waving and blather over gestures like this. What’s important to me is what you do, especially what you do for your country. I was a a Veteran’s Day event last year with a bunch of old farts like myself. I think most were there for the free lunch. Anyway, nobody was going on about their service or made a big deal of it. We just look at it as doing our job. I have a good friend who was a helicopter door gunner in Vietnam, a very dangerous job. I think he shares my opinion that all the to do over things like this is really pretty stupid. My own view, for what it’s worth, is that for decorum purposes, if a player is representing their country in an official tournament like the WC, WC qualifying, Gold Cup, or similar, then they should stand and respect the flag and anthem of their country and their opponents. But, if it’s a friendly match, who cares if they don’t stand for their own anthem..

    Liked by 1 person

  • two cents/lowercase letters guy

    i agree with the comments of anthony very much. (she’s allowed to say what she wants and us soccer is allowed to impose rules.) well said.

    there is no hypocrisy in using your first amendment right to petition peacefully for change. in fact, that’s what it’s for.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Alex

    Rapinoe is who we thought she was: pathetic and weak. The statement to “protest” the country while representing it is a bold move. However, when it came between herself and her supposed “values,” she chose herself. Now, most people don’t really believe her motives for why she protested. The same goes for Kapernicker. Our political system is way more messed up than a few prominent sports players could help stir the pot. Citizens turn on their news that develops daily manufactured consent. At least the smartest voters tend to be non-affiliated to any party because they know there is no correlation to what the bottom 90% want and the actual policies implemented. Do a YouTube search for “corruption is legal in America” to get a better idea of what I’m talking about.

    Like

  • Quit Whining About Soccer in the US

    In Seattle, where Megan lives, it is very interesting, many people don’t stand for the Nat Anthem. Never been a problem among the two choices and you can’t stereotype as to who will and who won’t.

    I am not naive enough to think there are no problems in Seattle, but there seem to be less.

    You come on a page like this and you realize why there are problems.

    One guy uses Colin K as his only example, then states lack of action of protestors?
    One calls Megan a cow and says move to the middle east?
    One says don’t try to “improve” things, intead quit the national team?….her job.

    I like to read all viewpoints, so thanks?

    Liked by 1 person

    • whammmm

      Are these “many people” wearing a red, white and blue jersey and minutes away from representing their country at the highest level? If not that point is null and void.

      Like

    • BrianK

      She is a professional soccer player. She can decline playing for the national team and still play soccer. She can join Carly Lloyd at Man City if she like or go to France like Alex Morgan.

      Muhammad Ali she is not.

      Like

  • two cents/lowercase letters guy

    thanks quit for that excellent synopsis.

    well the first amendment doesn’t say that you have to quit your job to speak freely. does it?

    Like

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