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Davies speeding case takes strange twist

Charlie Davies 1 (ISIphotos.com) 
 
American striker Charlie Davies could face prison time in France after revealing that he made false statements to French police following an incident where he and Sochaux teammate Jacques Faty were caught driving 125 MPH.

Davies had told police he was the driver of the car clocked driving 125 last Saturday, but revealed on Saturday that it was, in fact, Faty who was driving. According to Davies and Faty, they switched seats after being pulled over for speeding because Faty was driving with a suspended license (or at least thought he was) and the two mistakenly believed Davies would avoid serious punishment.

According to Davies, he was laying down in the car as the two were driving to Paris last Saturday and was unaware that Faty was driving his Audi Q7 125 MPH. When police pulled Faty over, the Senegalese-born defender concocted the terrible idea to tell police Davies was driving, assuming that an American would face less trouble with police.

Now, both Davies and Faty could face prison time for lying to police, though jail time seems to be a worst-case scenario for a player with no prior criminal record. Either way, the whole affair is an unfortunate and embarrassing one for Davies, who nearly died in a car accident exactly one year ago today.

Comments

  1. Well, nothing like a little prison sentence to help you reflect on life. However, if a few minutes away from a date with death doesn’t help you mature…

    This kid might be a neeze away from a mental dissability. Maybe the accident caused cerebral damage.

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  2. Well, there’s a thing called “reckless driving,” and if you get cited for it, you can indeed go to jail. Just saying that some laws do send people to jail for driving 60 MPH over the speed limit.

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  3. Ken and BCC –

    Please stop arguing. Comparing cars you drive on a soccer blog? It’s obvious you both have small weiners. Neither is bigger. Argument settled.

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  4. Charlie has already been in an accident in which someone else died and he nearly did. You would think that experience would lead him to be more careful about who drives him around, what condition they are in, and how fast they are going. What happened makes him look extremely foolish.

    Being a “hater” has nothing to do with this. I’d wager that most of the people on this thread want Charlie Davies to succeed, as this is an American soccer board and Davies’ success contributes to that of the American men’s game. However, in order to succeed (stay alive, even) Davies needs to make better choices.

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  5. There is a huge statistical difference between driving drunk and driving fast. This is just your personal opinion, and not that of the law or of popular belief. No western nation’s laws send people to jail for speeding at 125 on an interstate, but most do for drinking and driving. His friend would have gone to jail because of extenuating circumstance, not because of how fast he was going.

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  6. Agreed. Driving 10 mph over the limit is one thing, driving 125–WWAAAAAAYYYYYY over the limit, in the US and Europe, is reckless and puts other motorists/pedestrians/passengers at risk. If someone can do jail time for driving drunk, they should definitely have to do jail time if they’re caught driving 125 mph anywhere other than an Indy-car speedway.

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  7. Can’t take any more people. I was in a motorcycle accident as a younger man. At the time I blamed the other driver, stupid laws, the gravel on the road, and chance. As a (more experience) man I see that I was the reason for the accident. I have another motorcycle now (two actually), I don’t believe that speed kills… speeding children do.

    People labeling others who recognize, and are intollerant of, CD’s very poor descisions show their own poor judgment… irreguardless of age.

    So it’s easy to go stupid fast in a $80k+ car… that’s makes it NOT stupid?! Understandable, yes, for a child with little life experience. For a grown adult that’s been around the block once or twice, i’m not buying it.

    CD’s got a lot of growing up to do that he should have already done.

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  8. If my friend thought he was going to jail for speeding and I would just get a speeding ticket, I would gladly do the same. Glad you are not one of my friends, and feel sorry for those who call you such.

    The laws of men are imperfect, and therefore opportunities arise where they should be treated as such. going to jail for speeding definitely being one of those times. There is a disconnect here between the nature of the crime and the punishment potentially being doled out, when faced with the situation, I think he acted morally in trying to prevent someone who did not deserve such a potentially harsh and life ruining punishment from having it! Even though his own public image would be tarnished. This is the epitome of teamwork and self-sacrifice, a trait that is hard to find and highly valued in friendship and team sports.

    now get off your high horses and get a life all you hypocrites who pretend to be perfect and without sin.

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  9. We should do a study on the seriousness of traffic law violations….or not. Many people all over the world who are non-athletes also feel the need for speed, like my grandmother. And she does not deserve jail time, or some of these jerks on this website being pompous prudish pricks!

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  10. so you never sped? That is a waste of a nice sports car. Maybe you just didn’t get caught, in that case, you are hypocrite, which is worse than a lead foot!!

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  11. so you are the people who refuse to drive over 65 and clog up the left lane for all of us folks who think there is a difference in driving 5 or more miles over the semi-arbitrary speed limit and murdering someone.

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  12. I can’t even believe that I am commenting on this stupid argument. Yes, it was a lapse in judgment. YEs, it was stupid. I’m the type of person that doesn’t care AT ALL about athlete’s personal lives, or the mistakes they make, as long as it doesn’t affect the way they play. I wouldn’t care if he did coke off of a hooker’s chest…as long as it was at least 48 hours before a game. Obviously, most people don’t share this sentiment, but, the only way this affects his FOOTBALL career (not his driving career, not his doing stupid sh*t career) is if he does jail time and isn’t able to train. He11, even prisons have gyms. Bottom line: celebrities are HUMAN too!! With more money and temptation!! Just don’t mess it up when I pay to see you play.

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  13. All you judgemental haters that live in glass houses I’m sure will be back on your CD9 bandwagon WHEN he comes back and scores a brace or a hat trick for the NATs….

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  14. M3’s and 911’s are cars…thinner tires, racing wheels, low to the ground. You feel every bump in a car like that. the Q7 is an ultra-expensive, ultra-comfortable SUV. I can EASILY see how someone who is reclined, half asleep, with tinted windows, at night, could not realize that the car is going that fast.

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  15. All of you defending lying to police….should think twice, as to what you would do, or what you would want your kid to do in same circumstance.

    Do the crime, do the time – or at least man up and don;t make it worst with a botched cover-up, that’s life lesson 101 these days for anyone at all in the public eye…

    So yeah if the 2nd story is true they both were dumb, if the 1st story is true Charlie is beyond dumb.

    So what the car goes fast, pay attention especially if you think your license is suspended..duhh

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  16. One, it’s great you have owned two M3s and never gotten a speeding ticket. Woopee! I’ve owned 5 BMWs, and driven them all over Europe, and haven’t gotten a ticket in 30 years. I NEVER blamed the car. I pointed out that it is easy for someone to drive an Audi Q7 over 100mph, and that it’s not obvious from a reclined passenger seat. If you really had an M3 you’d know that. Plus, if you’d read my post carefully, you wouldn’t write such tripe.

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  17. As has been noted by others on the board,…we have all done something stupid in our youth. Also note that I am not a ‘hater’…whatever that is. But it is very clear that Charlie is a little slow on the uptake. I remember when he was interviewed at the conclusion of his first 1/2 season in Sweden. He was very upfront about his struggles and pointed out that he was struggling with his diet,…eating at McDonalds too frequently. My first thought was, “is it too hard to figure out that a club is paying you hundreds of thousands of dollars to be a professional athlete and your eating McDonalds seven days a week?”

    Then the whole breaking curfew-car accident thing. Now this? At what point does a light bulb go off in this young man’s head?

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  18. Right, clearly you don’t play sports for a living, where your teammates are your family and your human instinct is to help. Are you sure you’re human?

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  19. Oh, please, I’m 48. I’m all grown. Perhaps you’re perfect and can teach Charlie and all of us how to live a life without mistakes.

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  20. Driven M3s and 911s — it’s easy to tell you’re going fast. The increase in wind noise alone is enough. Look out the window and watch a fixed object go by. Yes, the cars handle well, are built for that kind of speed, but it’s not as if it is the same as doing 55 in a mini-van.

    Your friend’s inability to notice is not much in the way of evidence.

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  21. JC is a zombie so who cares what he thinks?

    CD just seems to have poor instincts in these situations. Nothing to lose me as a fan or whatnot.

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  22. I think people are reacting to A.) Davies’ decision to make another poor automotive related choice and B.) Choosing to lie to police which could land him in a French prison for 6 months. Saying people are reacting to a speeding ticket is oversimplifying matters. They’re reacting to Davies putting himself in yet another situation where he could have had another horrific accident that is out of his control.

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  23. It has nothing to do with race on the part of anyone in France. It comes down to a man was speeding who happened to be black. Then that man believes that because he is black that he will be treated more harshly than an American?
    American is not a race and Davies happens to be black. If your driving 125 mph or kmph I doubt the police had a chance to see your race or I doubt they care what race you are.
    So go cry racism on a non-soccer blog.

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  24. go the same dam question. people are too harsh these days , they are accusing him of not thinking, yet they are not thinking themselves.

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  25. He wasn’t driving and he was relaxing with his seat back, not watching the road of the speedo Meter. Jesus Christ some of you people are so overzealous and unforgiving . SMH

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  26. Wow, there’s some serious hyperbole flying around this thread! Davies is 24 years old–everybody who didn’t do anything stupid at age 24 can feel free to cast the first stone!

    What Davies did (whether he was the driver or the passenger) was incredibly stupid, ESPECIALLY given his history. The kid needs to do some growing up. I don’t think this makes him a bad person, but it does make him irresponsible, and he’s an adult now, so he should know better.

    There’s no way to justify going 125 mph unless you’re a race-car driver. The LEGAL limit is far below that, even in Europe, and posters who say “125 isn’t that big a deal; I do it all the time” are simply wrong. Your dumb driving doesn’t excuse Davies in the slightest. There’s a reason 125 is illegal, and that’s because it’s DANGEROUS, and you’d think someone who was in a wreck that killed a person would know that. When you’re driving that fast, you have a much more limited window in which to react to the unexpected, and the greater speed makes it all the more likely that if an accident does happen, it will be serious. This is just basic common f-ing sense.

    This incident doesn’t mean that Davies is evil, and it’s certainly nowhere near as bad as seeing an underage prostitute or murdering somebody, but it’s also behavior that speaks poorly of his current judgment. I hope the manager at Sochaux is giving him the what-for, and I hope Bradley will express his disapproval, too. Davies needs to do some growing up, and one of the ways for this to happen is if the authority figures in his life communicate to him that continued lapses in judgment may cost him the physical gifts and the professional opportunities he’s been given.

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  27. Ah, the joys of French laws. Lie to police, go to jail. Drug, rape and sodomize a 15 year old girl…walk the streets of gay Paris a free man.

    On a serious note…Davies is a dummy. He literally cheated death once before. I’m sorry that lesson has not resonated with him.

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