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What do you think of the USMNT coaching hire?

U.S. Soccer Federation

The new era of U.S. Soccer has been ushered in with the news that Juergen Klinsmann has been hired as head coach.

The former Germany striker and coach for the German national team and Bayern Munich will be introduced on Monday, when more details about his hiring, his personnel plans — for both coaches and players — and his vision for the future should emerge.

For the time being, the question for you is simple. What do you think of Klinsmann being given the reins of the U.S. men's national team? Cast your vote here:

How did you vote? What do you think of U.S. Soccer's decision?

Share your thoughts below.

Comments

  1. whatever, yeah!!, Ill eat my words but we now that is not going to happen, I don´t hate Bradley I just think he wasn´t a very good coach, just look at all the results he managed to blow…

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  2. More like 1.5 M.

    Face it the USSF had a bad year, bad Gold Cup, the women choking at their World Cup and Sunil being overwhelmed and losing the World Cup bid.

    The USSF had to make a big splash to take the heat off.

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  3. He’s a better BS artist with the media than Bradley ever was. One reason he is so beloved.

    Lots of style, questionable substance.

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  4. It’s not just Turkey.

    Hiddink managed a Russia team that failed to get to the World Cup because they were knocked out by Slovenia. Remember them? We played them in the World Cup.

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  5. None of the things you listed guarantees that he will be a good manager.

    As a minor example, Jason Kreis was a pretty averge player.

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  6. “if not for Jurgen the Germans would not be where they r right now.”

    Which Jurgen?

    There are a number of ways to take that statement.

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  7. Klinsmann will struggle because the player pool is currently in a bad place. The back 4 is a disaster and we don’t have any strikers who can be counted on for anything. Maybe Jurgen can light a fire under Altidore.

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  8. Bayern were 3 points out of first with 5 games to play when Klinsmann was fired.

    I don’t know about you, but I’d say that he wasn’t doing a bad job. Maybe he lost the squad; maybe the board hated him. Whatever happened he was not fired for poor on-field performance.

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  9. Please! I see so much passion for the game with kids that play it.
    It’s not love of the game. The fact is the most athletic kids play football (American), baseball and basketball. They get scholarships and dream of becoming rich.

    No USMNT coach is going to change that.

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  10. I’m still not getting the joke, but that’s OK. I’d take my chances on Hiddink’s success as a hired gun any day. If the general consensus is that one cycle is good for a coach/NT program, then they’re all hired guns.

    Good coaches are good coaches and he’s punched above his weight for a while now. Jury still out on Turkey.

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  11. I dont know if Klinsmann is the right man for our team. But we must all rally behind him and back him no matter what. I hope he does well and I hope we see new faces on Aug 10th. Like Disk, Chandler, Torres, Castillo, Joe Corona etc.

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  12. Can’t see MB yet. He still has some growing up to do. I love his fire, passion, tenacity, and work ethic but he does have some flaws. Once he irons those out, he could make a good captain – but that is several years out IMHO.

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  13. Really good points. If you take a look at the whole picture, Bob probably knew that he was agreeing to a no-win situation. It was a marriage of convenience where both probably knew deep down it was not going to work. In some ways, both are equally at fault.

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  14. CG: hiddink is simply a hired gun. my comment re: us soccer is more to it’s issues than hiddink.

    however, hiddink would fail almost as certainly as gullit did (see below for the joke) in the US — although he was mls.

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  15. I agree Bob was unlucky with injuries. Losing Charlie Davies might have been the biggest blow of them all. As many have said, our player pool is not that deep, quality-wise.

    Hopefully Klinsmann can begin to change that. A massive undertaking — to change an entire coaching paradigm in youth soccer development. I’m not sure any one person can accomplish this, but why not Klinsi….?

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  16. Bernhardt Peters? Maybe not as his #2, but part of his staff. I seem to remember Klinsmann leaving the Germany post because of the DFBs unwillingness to hire a very successful fieldhockey coach as part of their setup. Peters went on to become a key part of Hoffenheim’s back room team. Not sure if he’s still at Hoffenheim since Rangnick quit?

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  17. Wouldn’t get US soccer?? He got South Korean soccer. He got Australian soccer. He got Russian soccer. He’s getting Turkish soccer. Obviously has a little bit to say about Dutch soccer.

    C’mon.

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  18. Just curious, but what does Gulati’s hometown have to do with your comments? Are you insinuating that people who aren’t born in this country should always be questioned and assumed to be “against us”?

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  19. I voted it was the right move to make, but wrong hire.
    Klinsmann is overrated. There’s a reason he was in such low demand overseas. He’s sounds like a great coach, and his brilliant playing career makes people think he could be a great coach – but so far, his managing career hasnt amounted to much.
    I for the absolute life of me, cannot understand why fans are enamored with this guy.

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  20. haha If your dad was Jurgen Klinsman and you have to trying to stop 1000 shots/day from him growing up would make for a good goalkeeper.

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  21. And you think one organization can do that? If you think US Soccer is so good that they will organize all of the talented soccer players in the US (how can they identify them all?) and develope them, and feed them, etc… you have your hopes misplaced.

    Decentralizing always works.

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  22. its superb, exactly what we needed, now its going to be the time we show those Bradley lovers what a capable coach looks like

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  23. I’m curious to read what type of control Klinsi has over the youth system. Klinsmann’s previous comments about our backwards youth system is one the many reasons I’ve been a fan of his for the last few years.

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  24. I’m not clear on your statement and I can’t tell if you are being sarcastic.

    Do you really think the “US Program” should be in charge of everything? What is the “US program”? You want Sunil Gulati, a native of Allahabad, India, to be in charge and make all of the decisions?

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  25. “You have the fact that in the U.S. it’s mostly organized soccer, when we know that the best players in the world come out of unorganized events.” Jurgen Klinsman

    It doesn’t matter who the USMNT coach is…as long as we continue to produce these joyless robots…talented kids who have never fallen in love with game…we will never get to the top…or even near it…

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  26. According to the German press, Klinsmann was fired from Bayern Munich in part because he tried to implement unconventional new-agey training approaches (“pictures of Buddha in the locker room”) and lost the confidence of the senior players. Not to mention that they lost a lot of games… I’m sure Landon won’t mind a few meditation sessions, particularly if they take place on the beach. Hey, this is going to be fun to watch!

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  27. I hope:

    Klinsmann has a plan to revamp the approach to youth soccer in the United States. A fresh eye toward scouting, and more flexibility with bringing in players who play on the fringes. If we are hoping he is going to deliver a team capable of winning trophies between now and 2014, we might as well go ahead and start working on our disappointment.

    I believe:

    Klinsmann is a PR hire. This job is, to him, an audition to get back into the Bundesliga as a coach. He will bring a fresh eye toward player selections, new methods of practice and training, new attacking philosophies, and a sense of urgency in possession. In the end, we will be a slightly better team with JK than we were with Bradley, but the USSF needs changes from top to bottom to take the next step. One coach on a 4 year cycle is not going to change that.

    To end on a positive note, I am happy now that we scheduled that friendly vs Mexico. That will be a great litmus test for Klinsmann.

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  28. Reyna might be a good choice for one of his assistant coaches, but not for his number 2. I think he brings in a x’s and o’s guy with lot’s coaching experience.

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  29. I’m pretty ambivalent about this. I think that many of the recent issues with the USMNT had to do with the player pool, e.g. no strong forwards, and injuries, e.g. Stu Holden, and NOT with the Bob. I think that he was a good manager and enabled us to accomplish some things that hadn’t happened before (finals of a FIFA competition and winning our WC2010 group) with little credit. It is obvious that Gulati has been trying to land Klinsman as coach for some time and finally was willing to give Klinsi what he wanted. I think he will work out reasonably well and will be rooting for him and the team, but still feel bad for how Bob was treated.

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  30. Reyna played at a very high level while a player. He was an intelligent player who had very good technique.

    He has already shown he is interested in coaching as a career.

    He knows the US soccer mentality, and he is familiar with the US’s current youth set up.

    If Klinsmann does end up jumping ship prematurely, I would feel comfortable with someone like Reyna.

    People respected him as a player, and I can easily imagine him garnering respect as a coach.

    I was fortunate to speak with him briefly during WC2006 and he comes across as wise and grounded.

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  31. huge gaps in midfield does not necessarily equal mismanagement. It can also just be a case of players not playing well enough, choosing poor times to go forward and getting caught out of position….there are literally hundreds of reasons that there is a gap in midfield. And while I agree that playing a high line against Mexico while up 2 and going for more goals was a bad decision in hindsight, that’s kind of a damned if you do, damned if you don’t. I can’t even count the number of times I’d heard people complain about “Bunker Bob” being ultra-conservative with a lead.

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