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Must-See Commercial: ESPN World Cup Promo 2

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  1. I’m Ghanaian and my first reaction when I saw this was to laugh. Yes the guy on the bike is a bit of a stretch but there are times when rolling blackouts occur. Even though Kumasi is a large city, blackouts do occur from time to time.

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  2. I am so screwed, got scheduled for “training” at work on June 16. Going to take more than calling in sick to get out of this one.

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    • here come the PC police… and being someone that has been there… plenty of places have no electricity..

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    • It does smack of stereotype, but only 60% of rural Ghana is on the electrical grid (thanks, Google), so it isn’t inaccurate.

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    • I love that you are asking if this is offensive. Should I be offended? Is there some downtrodden group here being made fun of that I can defend and feel superior?

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    • I also thought this commerical was perhaps a little offensive–it seems to rely on a lot on stereotypes. Still enjoyed it though.

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    • I actually came here to post about the same thing. I was in a far more rural area of Ghana during the Confed Cup in 2009, and I watched it all without a problem. Kumasi ain’t rural Ghana. It’s the largest city in one of the most developed and stable African countries. There’s no shortage of electricity there. Ghanaians probably won’t be happy about that one.

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    • To that end, Brazil is not unanimously enamored with World Cup ’14 – not by a long shot. The idea that every favela-dweller will be stoked and cooking sausages on his shanty rooftop terrace is a farce. The protests are well documented.

      But that isn’t the point. ESPN tried to sum up mankind’s love of, and dedication to, the World Cup in a one-minute commercial. If we deconstruct every scene, I’m sure we’ll have plenty to talk about and yet completely miss the point.

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    • The image was of one small saloon in the largest city in Ghana.

      Maybe the offensive part is stereotyping an entire block, or neighborhood, or city, or country based on imagery by an advertising agency from Portland, Oregon, showing one small saloon.

      Surely if someone is conscious and sensitive enough to pre-emptively sniff offensiveness where it may not actually exist, they’re also conscious and sensitive enough to tell the difference between an advertisement and a documentary.

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    • No is not offensive. .. actually is ironic because there are constant lights off for a country that is a major producer of electricity

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  3. O/T but off with their heads.

    Donovan, Goodson, Parkhurst, Evans. JK is the 1 supreme NT coach in this country. He shall not be doubted or up for deceit. He will lead us to the Semi’s in a most glorious manner. Have faith my brothers n sisters. The former is washed up and the other 3 had no chance in Brazil other than being water boys.

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