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McKennie wins Italian Super Cup as Juventus edges Napoli

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Weston McKennie made history on Wednesday becoming the first modern-day American player to win the Italian Super Cup.

Juventus edged Napoli 2-0 in Wednesday’s Final, picking up its first trophy of the new season. McKennie lifted the first trophy in his club career, despite not putting in his best performance this season for the Old Lady.

After a scoreless first-half, Andrea Pirlo’s side broke the deadlock with Cristiano Ronaldo scoring in the 64th minute. Federico Bernardeschi’s corner kick was flicked onward by Leonardo Bonucci, allowing Ronaldo to pounce on the loose ball and score past David Ospina.

It was Ronaldo’s 760th career goal for club and country, making him the top scorer in the history of the sport.

McKennie almost saw his team pegged back in the 80th minute after the midfielder brought down — inside of the box for a penalty. However, Lorenzo Insigne’s spot kick was saved by Wojciech Szczesny to keep the defending Serie A champs in front.

Alvaro Morata would come off the bench to ice the victory, scoring in the 95th minute before celebrating with his teammates.

McKennie finished the match with 90 minutes played, an 81% passing completion rate, three chances created, and six recoveries, despite conceding the second-half penalty kick. The U.S. Men’s National Team star will now look to help his team fight in Serie A play, where they’re currently fifth place.

Up next for Juventus is a home date with Bologna on January 24th before a Coppa Italia showdown with Spal.

Comments

  1. I thought he had a good game. The penalty was BS, he didn’t even see the Napoli player. The player threw his leg in front of Weston’s as he was going to boot the ball out of the area. I think Pirlo thought the same as he didn’t sub him out.

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  2. I’m definitely not a rah rah type but I agree. McKennie set up multiple dangerous chances. He was a force on the ball, and his usual tenacious self. More players r going to try and win penalties like that if FIFA doesn’t clamp down. Ridiculous.

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  3. That description of the penalty doesn’t tell the full story. McKennie picked up the ball in his own box and had no idea someone was behind him. As he looked upfield to pass, the attacker stuck his leg in front of McKennie, and Weston took him out while trying to pass. The attacker didn’t even get the ball. BS call. McKennie could have had an assist early in the 2nd half but a teammate fanned on the cross with an open goal.

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    • He also found Ronaldo in the box in the waning minutes only for Ronaldo to fluff his lines.

      I don’t know where I stand on the penalty. It seems like in the strictest sense, he was culpable in the same way a defender might be culpable for a handball he didn’t know much about. Mertens was certainly crafty to get his foot in there and McKennie was caught completely unawares. I don’t know how someone could hold it against him, at any rate, and the missed penalty felt like a bit of justice.

      McKennie’s engine is just terrific, though. With the way he gets forward in attack and pitches in on defense, it’s almost like having two players in there.

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    • I totally disagreed with the call on the penalty. Dried Mertens kind of cheated and stuck his foot in before Mckennie tried to make a pass without knowing Mertens’ foot was there. The ref and VAR basically encouraged other players to cheat in similar fashion in the future. Having said that, I’m happy for Mckennie to have won his first professional championship in a top league.

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