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Klopp, Cherundolo among USMNT head coach candidates for USSF to consider

The U.S. men’s national team’s early exit from the 2024 Copa America has led to serious calls for Gregg Berhalter’s firing as head coach.

Berhalter is only one year into his second stint as head coach, but a group stage exit from this summer’s competition might spell the end of his time in the role. The 50-year-old watched as the USMNT struggled for consistency at the Copa America, losing back-to-back matches against Panama and Uruguay to suffer elimination.

With the 2026 FIFA World Cup two years away, U.S. Soccer needs to consider a change in order to get the USMNT ready for an experience of a lifetime.

Here is a closer look at several candidates that U.S. Soccer should consider if they truly decide to part ways with Berhalter:


Jurgen Klopp, Free Agent


The odds of U.S. Soccer having the funds to pay a manager like Klopp are slim, but why not consider him?

Klopp has lifted 13 trophies during his managerial career with both Liverpool and Borussia Dortmund. After leaving Liverpool last spring, Klopp has been on the market for the last few months as he ponders what’s next for his career.

The 57-year-old helped Liverpool get back into the limelight of English Football over the past 10 years, winning the UEFA Champions League, English Premier League, and multiple domestic cups.

A reunion with former Borussia Dortmund player Christian Pulisic would also be a positive for both the USMNT and Klopp.

Klopp has never managed a national team though, and who knows if he wants to go that route.


Steve Cherundolo, LAFC


A familiar face to USMNT fans would be LAFC boss Steve Cherundolo.

Cherundolo is in his fourth year of being a head coach, remaining with MLS powerhouse LAFC. After lifting both the Supporters’ Shield and MLS Cup in 2022, Cherundolo led LAFC back to the league final in 2023.

The current Western Conference leaders remain a major threat to lift another league title by year’s end, a testament to Cherundolo’s work with the club.

After a 15-year playing career in Germany, Cherundolo worked with Hannover’s youth system before making his move back to North America. He earned 87 caps with the USMNT as a player, winning the CONCACAF Gold Cup in 2015.

If U.S. Soccer wants familiarity, Cherundolo would be the safe choice, but again, who knows the route that the federation wants to go.


Patrick Vieira, Strasbourg


Six years after leaving the United States, Patrick Vieira could be an option for the USMNT.

Currently the manager of Ligue 1 side Strasbourg, Vieira is in his fourth managerial stint of his career. A former Arsenal and France legend as a player, Vieira has also managed NYCFC, Crystal Palace, and Nice in his career.

The 48-year-old is also more affordable than other coaches on the market, earning close to $3 million a season in France.

However, a career 38% winning percentage in over 290 matches is a tad worrying for a USMNT program wanting to compete against the best in the world.


Wilfried Nancy, Columbus Crew


Wilfried Nancy is only in his second season as head coach of the Columbus Crew but the 47-year-old is one of the top options in North America.

Nancy led the Crew to an MLS Cup win last season, defeating mighty LAFC 2-1 in the final. The Frenchman has only been a first team manager for four years now, previously working with CF Montreal from 2021-22.

Nancy has helped the Crew become a contender again in MLS, while also making a deep run in the CONCACAF Champions Cup this season.

Whether or not Nancy wants to make the jump to a major international role remains to be seen, but he certainly should be considered for his positive work in Columbus.


Zinedine Zidane, Free Agent


It’s been three years since Zinedine Zidane has been on the sidelines, but a move to the USMNT could help him get back on the map.

Zidane served as Real Madrid manager on two different spells, leading Los Blancos to seven trophies, In 320 matches as manager of Real Madrid’s first and second teams, Zidane has won over 60% of his matches, proving he has been able to deliver a consistent record.

Like the others on this list, Zidane has never managed on the international level, opening the door to questions. However, the 52-year-old certainly brings plenty of experience to the mix, something that you can’t teach.

Comments

  1. USSF announcing decision this week. Seems likely Berhalter is out. That’s a quick decision by USSF standards. Which would mean they likely have the next coach lined up.

    Reply
    • It’s a pretty similar timetable to removing Vlatko and it took two months for them to hire Emma Hayes. Which honestly if it takes them 2 months and they get one of the top 10 managers in the world I’d be ok.

      Reply
      • I think a new coach will be in place before the fall friendlies. I think it will be important to incorporate new ideas as soon as possible.

      • 2tone, I hope so, but I’d rather they get some really good for November than get someone mediocre today.

      • JR: dude, explain to me how this takes any longer than a week. zero time to fire, that’s a joke. get on the phone with the target’s agent. here’s our offer. here’s our counter. here’s a compromise offer. i think we should be announcing a replacement in a week, not a retention decision.

        fwiw a court in texas is about to reinstate noncompetes so if GB wants to get greedy on his severance he can serve out his noncompete until 2026. personally where’s the dude’s sense of shame. i am sure he can get another gig.

      • the list of foreign coaches i proposed is not “mediocre.” nor if klopp or pep are lined up in a year at contract end are we getting them in “november.” you know who we get in “november” or “december?” that’s MLS coaches.

        it is absurd to have years of caretakers — what i anticipate if we fire then do a full blown process or wait on MLS hires — only to get “berhalter quality” after we wait. i get waiting for the equivalent of hayes. i don’t get waiting on whoever’s coaching LA or columbus or whatnot.

        to me if you want a MLS coach we lean upon their team’s national pride or wave an additional check, and short circuit the process. we are running out of time. i think it’s pretty clear from the year under GB that delay proved not worth it.

      • IV: all I’m saying is if it’s lining up Bob Bradley for next Wednesday I’d rather wait for November for Klopp. I’m not ok to wait until November for Chris Armas.

    • it’s not a quick decision. it’s unnecessary time wasting. there really shouldn’t be a “decision” here based on results, that in and of itself is an overthinking joke. and that decision shouldn’t take ~ 10 days.

      reminder, we’re doing this right when teams are starting practice in europe, you want to grab the available ones fast and you don’t want the ones who would have to beg off a job to be starting up camp before you can do the obvious

      it took arena 3 days to resign his post, and that probably includes a day on planes to get home from TnT. and he quit, we didn’t have to swing the axe.

      Reply
      • IV: in the confounding delay department, Olympic rosters were supposedly due July 3. Here we sit 3 days later with cryptic tweet this morning that said “Soon” and leaks starting to come out on most of the roster.

  2. And marsch has Canada in the Semis. We could have had Marsch. I do think his style translates to the modern international game.

    Reply
  3. Whoever ends up the head coach needs to be prepared for the deranged fan base that is only equaled by England’s fan base. The funny part is England’s overrated squad has actual reasons to be overrated. The fact the US fan base has the same expectations of it’s team as England’s is laughable. Good luck meeting expectations next coach – you will fail (see talent pool exponentially overrated by fan base)

    Reply
    • I’ll say it again, I honestly disagree.
      I think we have a good group of talented players who have yet to play well together as a team… There’s a difference.
      It sounds like you think as a group they’re overrated. I think we’re not very deep at many spots but I disagree with your assertion.
      But that’s why we’ve all been coming to SBI for a long time

      Reply
    • MotO,

      If Gregg stays it means they have reviewed the situation and discovered that he was not at fault.

      Which means the players that Gregg spent 5.5 years evaluating, assembling and organizing are mostly at fault.

      If Gregg is gone, it means he is the scapegoat and that they think someone else can make chicken soup out of this chicken shit.

      The chicken shit is talented but features only five regular starters in a Top Five league club, CP, Flo, Jedi , JScal and Weston ( sort of).

      And with the possible exception of CP , none of them are “stars”.

      Everyone else is a journeyman or “promising”.

      There is so much high level soccer on TV right now.

      Just for fun watch the teams in Euros and Copa America that advanced into the knockout stage. Tell me if you can spot a non-big boy (France, Argentina, etc.) team with a player pool that is equal to or less than the USMNT pool.

      The Golden Generation has turned out to be Fools Gold but that does not mean that a good manager could not make a much better team than what we have been seeing for 5.5 years.

      Right now the USMNT is an embarrassment. I thought Couva was the bottom. In some ways this is worse.
      The next manager does not have to win the World Cup.
      They just have to get them just a bit higher than what has been a very, very, very low bar.

      Reply
      • Yup, this team needs a coach that has them competing like Austria, Switzerland, Croatia or Denmark. That’s the ceiling for this group. I’ve been saying that since before Qatar. The fan base has lost the plot because Pulisic developed outside the US and players are getting regular CL games. Like no other country has players doing the same. Hey, those teams mentioned above are fun to watch and can pull out some special things. I’d love to have a US team like that. This team…with GB…have not proven to be at that level.

  4. Ecuador immediately fired their manager who got their team out of the group and took Argentina to penalties. Since Berhalter’s return, Sanchez is 7-4-5 (w-t-l). Losses to Argentina twice, Italy, and Venezuela twice (which might have something to do with the dismissal). Beat Uruguay and currently 5th in WC qualifying. No excuses made because a player got a red card or scuffed their penalty, didn’t matter that they outplayed Argentina the 2nd half.

    Reply
    • Contractually, it would be cheaper if Gregg resigns. The USSF are cheapskates so that could be a factor.

      Maybe they are waiting for Southgate to be free.

      Reply
    • Apparently Sanchez was having talks with a club in Qatar, so Ecuador got rid of him before he could resign.

      Reply
  5. Big picture looking to the future. We’ve finally developed a player pool which consistently reaches 1000+ UCL minutes played. This is a huge step forwards. Our coaching depth has gotten better (Marsch, Wagner, Dolo) but we’ve had very few managers in top five leagues much less at UCL level, or actually win a top five league as a manager. That day is still in our future. Somewhere there’s a U14 player who develops into a excellent CB he’s not great but good enough to get a few years in but journeys a bit finally hanging it up before 30 to join future Tim Ream’s managerial staff at Fulham FC. He gets his first shot in the Championship getting the club promoted first year which stays up 3-4 years mid table then the big club calls. Man U then has an American manager. It’s 30-40 years since Ted Lasso jokes so they run the old show reels to laugh but this guys knows how to win. Around the same time Pulisic has been toiling as US soccer TD. He rewrites youth coaching materials just as Claudio Reyna did in the early 2010s. This produces our second even more talented golden generation. Our now grey haired gristled manager after winning UCL and EPL titles hears the call takes the reigns as USMNT manager. Leads the US to WC glory. We lift the cup sometime between 2054 and 2062 if we do everything right.

    Reply
    • Or we could hire a manager with experience managing, coaching, and winning top fives leagues and UCL now as a manager, but that guys not American today.

      Reply
  6. We are hosting a world cup. Bet the farm. Give Klopp whatever he wants. Anything less than a semis appearance is failure.

    Reply
  7. klopp and zidane are the only off this list worthy of the supposed mission. i think we want to get out of this cheap value coach nonsense. i prefer dolo or noonan if it has to be a MLS product, but i see that whole path as bargain-basement and “value” bin with too much of the same risk as GB in the first place.

    i put up a few more on one of the other articles. pochettino, low, dunga, blanc, solksjaer.

    wagner has barely had to actually win in his whole career and his recent work he didn’t win the championship. before that he lost a lot. matarazzo hasn’t done a ton either, just kept his team up. those reek of the same sort of fanboy mentality we have with player selection.

    if it has to be foreign but cheap maybe go with a recent former player similar to what we did with klinsi. ruud won at a decent clip with PSV. all else fails he could teach our strikers a thing or two.

    Reply
  8. Klopp would be amazing, checks the boxes across the board. I love Dolo too and have always thought he’d be coach of the USMNT some day

    but Klopp brings instant credit from the powers and their whistle blowers/swallowers for an instant rising tide for all boats

    he’s also historically able to build with infrastructure top to bottom, build and earn belief, with a dynamic arsenal of abilities from interpersonal to tactical to managerial to…name it really.

    Klopp is a proven leader of men who takes what he has and builds it up to the next level, and the next, etc. until he’s all used up

    This JK, Jurgen Klopp, would change everything for us

    Please come to America!!

    Reply
    • i see one way around the price problem as you seek out someone with a passion for the country. kind of like henry had as a player. like he would vacation here and all but telegraphed he wanted to come here and play. and so we got 5 years out of him and probably not full price. i mean, people forget klinsi lives here and has an american wife, kid who played in our YNT system and is a working pro.

      but henry himself, montreal and monaco weren’t very good. so not him specifically.

      so you want someone with literally those kind of connections, or at least conveys excitement or is here vacationing or something. maybe that gets you a passion discount and legacy be damned attitude. and i still think with the mess we just looked if the experiment fails a big name can brush this off as not their fault. but i think we have talent and our coach is a joke. i also think for a ton of people the USA is irresistible. and more cynically, the checks wouldn’t bounce. relatively safe. already top 16 before they touch it. i think this is a hard job to mess up and yet GB does it somehow.

      Reply
      • IV,

        If Klopp, Zizou or Pep wanted to get away from the insanity of living in Europe with their celebrity status, they could come live in America and enjoy the life here.

        They don’t need to be the USMNT manager to do that.

        I’m pretty sure they can afford it without the help of the USSF.

  9. re cost, the fact we have been doing this low-rent with GB and he has 2 years left, would limit expense of a buyout. if he’s still at $1.4m or neighborhood x 2 years left that’s maybe $2.8m, less than klinsi got to go away. and to be clear, the expense of a $3m buyout even later in the 2018 cycle was not treated as beyond our affordability then. [and inflation has happened since.]

    likewise, this being a 2 year situation and not a 4 year deal limits the overall contract cost on a replacement.

    the accounting for coaching costs since 2014 neglects our approach has resulted in abundant redundancies. we paid for 3 coaches during the 2018 cycle, 2 coaches during the 2022 cycle, and at least 2 coaches this cycle, perhaps a 3rd this cycle. at the point arena was hired we were literally paying for 2 coaches for the same time period. which means the position cost us klinsi+arena.

    last, related point, it’s fairly absurd to bring up money now when god knows how much USSF paid the lawyers to investigate and do a report on GB — before he was rehired.

    if you want to save money on the job, quit hiring schmucks.

    Reply
    • Technically it ties Peru in 1935 when there were only 4 teams and the went 1-2 but we had a better GD. But yeah pretty sad.

      Reply
      • between this and going to the last seconds of jamaica this should have obvious implications for keeping a coach to host a tournament.

      • You would think right. I keep telling myself they’re just waiting for the Friday news dump on a holiday weekend. But there’s been no leaks/rumors coming from the national media that something is up and that frightens me.

  10. I have a witnessed a bad arrogance rise in this team when they step on the field against any team. You can see it in their play and mannerisms. Hopefully this humbled them all.

    Reply
    • I’m done calling them the most talented team and golden generation. Quite frankly I think it’s gone to their heads.

      Reply
  11. Also the federation building will be in Atlanta. So you could literally live in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama all states that surrounds Atlanta. Beautiful and cheaper places to live.

    Reply
    • what practical, productive purpose does requiring the NT HC to go to an office serve? to me it’s like the language requirements and other checklist crap. pointless. ironically the one resume requirement they got rid of was trophy success. we’ll hire a former D3 keeper with no head experience to caretake but what matters is he speaks english and presumably shows up for office hours. pfffft

      Reply
      • What makes you believe other National team coaches don’t have an office at their national team Head quarters? Much better in Atlanta then in Chicago.

  12. I am not for “ultra mega super star” like Klopp or Zidane, buta coach more with International view soccer, less “Disney” viewpoint, focus tactics and formation based his current talent pool of players.

    Reply
    • well, i feel like we have been bargain basement and domestic on coaches since 2017 — arena, sarachan, GB, callaghan — with little to show for the value approach. we keep betting on economy class and not even getting peanuts on the trip. to me it’s time to identify someone known for success, little doubt about their likelihood for success here, and pay what it takes.

      norwich, a second division team, is the only place wagner has ever won. a lot of the names i am hearing suggested sound like a slightly updated version of the berhalter hiring pools. which to me came across decidedly low-rent. so think bigger. dolo and noonan are the only domestics winning consistently right now, and i personally think their CVs, while better than GB’s, are thin or 1-stop enough they aren’t the sure things we need. i am not sure nancy or vieira gets it done.

      no, i think we need to step up on expense and outsource this one. i think we need more of a sure thing. to me the folks attacking any suggestion of anyone foreign and good as too expensive have drunk the koolaid or are depressed/self-loathing. the players have to be unredeemably bad or undisciplined, and we’re either not going to fire the schmuck or only hire his rough third-rate domestic equivalent. which, well, the likely outcome if you do roughly the same crap is get roughly the same results. maybe dolo is a hidden gem, and if we have to do domestic, him and noonan are my picks, but this whole debate is kind of accepting a cheapskate, don’t deserve better mindset. so maybe don’t.

      Reply
      • IV

        “norwich, a second division team, is the only place wagner has ever won. ”

        Wagner got Huddersfield town promoted to the EPL in 2017 and kept them up the following season an absolutely miraculous achievement.

        Give the man the credit he deserves.

  13. The problem with this list is that none of those coaches have any international experience, NONE. We have tried a “system “ approach from a club coach and it hasn’t worked. We have tried a famous legendary player, tried the best MLS coach. How about we find a coach who, I don’t know, has actually coached some major international tournaments. We don’t need someone to pick players, they pick themselves because only a handful are true international quality and it’s obvious who they are. We need someone who can be flexible with formations and lineups, who can gameplan for specific opponents, and who can adjust in-game to what the opponent is doing. If by some miracle klopp or pep was interested by all means, but other than them, no club coaches.

    Reply
    • I can entertain the dream, but don’t really think there’s much chance we’ll be seeing Klopp. However- we’d quite obviously be preposterously, ridiculously stupid and naive to refuse him- not do everything in our power to make it happen if he were open to it. With his body of work, temperament- I have z e r o doubt he’d figure out how to manage a national team.

      Reply
    • how do i put this. i think half our problem is suits channeling the coach on how we’re gonna operate. i wish we’d hire a coach with a history and system that fit international ball. i don’t buy anyone we have hired can be trusted to accurately divine that answer and pick the right coach accordingly. do you think matt crocker is privy to soccer genius? i think he’s a system zealot like the coach, hired to enforce the system across the various teams. system doesn’t work best i can tell. so i don’t want him deciding what candidates have good or realistic soccer ideas.

      nah, personally i am like end the empire building and system-obsession and hire a good coach who can game manage and is known for some degree of adaptability. then turn the sucker over to him. i don’t think the coaches need suits telling them how to roll or forcing some concept on them. i think this is wind the coach up then clear out the way.

      i also think the scouts should serve the coach and not vice versa. something is off in the scouting and performance process because it doesn’t seem to matter how a prospect plays or how the games go or how someone does. that and we seem scared to take risks on young talented players with limited first team time.

      Reply
  14. Guess Klopp sent out an Instagram post that has sent fans in a frenzy. He said he was thinking about his time coming to the states with Liverpool and the US fans are electric. And wished all fans a happy fourth of July. Klopp thinking about taking over the USMNT?

    Reply
  15. Wouldn’t be surprised if USSF are waiting to see how Mitrovic does at the Olympics. If Mitrovic does well then him moving up to take over for the USMNT for 2 years would make sense.

    Reply
    • age group coaching and assistantships? he’s literally never coached an adult pro team and you’re like here do the US? and it’s not like he’s turned U23 into a juggernaut. does anyone’s performance matter?

      Reply
    • Dempsey: doesn’t want it, and he doesn’t much like Bruce. That’s fine as a player but managers an assistants have to get along
      Friedel: fine, he just took a role with Bestikas though so probably not interested.
      JJ: sure, his team is pretty bad but USL League 1 is pretty limited resources
      Arena: Failed qualifying in 2018. Last place in group in 2006. Bizarre ending to his time in NE, although MLS has cleared him to return if someone wants to hire him.

      Reply
    • Arena is not a good option. 1) He’s too closely tied to USSF and MLS, which was part of the reason he failed in 2018 when he took over. 2) GGG is a branch off the Arena coaching tree….which I’d be concerned that GGG was still influencing things. 3) I still recall the 2006 failure….which was reinforced by the 2018 failure.
      4) There are better options available.
      ——–
      We don’t have to get a “Big Name” manager like Klopp, Lowe, etc. What we need is an experienced manager. Someone with European/S. American club management experience and someone who has experience at the international level (at least as an assistant coach). Lastly IMO we have to bring in someone from outside USSF/MLS to help wipe the stick of Berhaulter out of the program.
      As much as I like Dolo, I don’t think he has enough time/experience as a Head Coach.

      Reply
    • arena would be a signal we are completely out of ideas. the idea he’s a NT coaching superman should already be disproven by 06 and 17. maybe if he’d won the CR and couva games he becomes the “break glass” emergency option.

      Reply
  16. Pretty entertaining article.
    I’ll bite. Klopp and Zidane spent a lifetime building a reputation as top managers and they’re not about to ruin it by being associated with such a third rate organization such as the USSF.
    Stop talking about money as if they’re destitute and unemployable.
    The bit about Klopp being reunited with Pulisic was hilarious tho.

    Reply
    • Zidane, in fact, was approached in 2023 & declined. Klopp’s reputation as a manager is higher for me, as the teams he took over were a greater challenge than talent and money rich Madrid.

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  17. Offer Klopp 20% of the prize money. That would be easier to negotate than an MLS franchise. Why are coaches paid a fixed salary and players are paid with incentives? Makes no sense.

    The 4th place team got 25MM — there’s 5MM right there to bridge the gap.

    Oh shoot! We already gave away HALF of the prize money to the women.

    Well, at least we’ll win the world cup of virtue signaling.

    Reply
    • my understanding is the opposite. forbes said they have the same base salary. he was previously $1.4m last cycle. she’s at $1.6m. that money is top drawer for women but third-rate for men. i remind people USSF just settled an equal pay lawsuit and might be elevating superficial appearance of equity compliance over whether the two jobs are really equally staffed. people who just settled a lawsuit over whether women deserve what men make would be unusually closed to the idea we need more money for our coaching to match theirs in quality.

      someone said sunk costs. i don’t think it’s that. at least anymore. i think they have to know this is bust. i think it could only rationally be they neither want to pay to fix it nor admit that for coaching purposes our coach is going to have to cost more. which is about going/future cost and not sunk expense.

      Reply
      • On Futbol Americas yesterday they were saying that multiple sources within US Soccer that the two managers salaries would not have to match.

  18. Flash. The US is not winning the next WC regardless of who the coach is. Period!

    We need a guy that can take this team to the NEXT level not to the finals. The coach needs to set the stage for continued program growth.

    I think the bigger issue is the underlying organization and infrastructure. We seem to be gaining talent via dual-nationals versus developing them domestically. Until that changes then we will not get to the top.

    Reply
    • @cmills000
      agree with you, well said.
      and I would add I don’t know what the next level is re. this current group; if it is Klopp, he hopefully brings a level of credibility to how our team is perceived by others, namely officials and those they answer to, immediately the tide rising for all. It’s not a small thing, and if he could do that, plus what you discussed (Liverpool amazing development, structure, atmosphere, etc.), we’ll be what fans thought we were already 😉

      Reply
    • i agree that big picture it’s a development issue where dual nationals are covering up domestic weakness. i also agree with the riposte that development is an age group soccer job. half the current problem is thinking some system zealot can fix 25 year olds with some weird scheme, then they tell us the scheme can’t work on any meaningful timeframe.

      i don’t think we are likely winning the world cup, and i think the players bear some responsibility for what’s happening, both on the field and in terms of the bizarre and unjustified public loyalty levels. but most NT coaches are hired and fired over winning and losing and in a functioning, apolitical NT what just happened should suffice. you don’t normally have to go into some elaborate added analysis how much the players let him down, or what the ceiling with any coach would be. it suffices they are making this worse or unacceptably limiting how far it can go.

      i mean i remember folks arguing tab ramos at houston had junk his first year and they sucked his second year too. the argument reeks of paralysis or self loathing. you either believe he’s doing the job well or not. you shouldn’t have to negate all other possible inputs in some multifactor analysis.

      “we aren’t winning enough” usually suffices.

      Reply
  19. I’m going to bump this up because it would have been easy to miss in some of the larger threads below but Vacqui had the best suggestion I’ve ever seen to score an absolute coup with a coach: offer them what we lured David Beckham to come across in 2007 – the right to buy an MLS franchise.

    Lest everyone shrug and say: “so what”…no other country on Planet Earth has something like that to offer. In 2007 when Golden Balls came across, the total payroll for every team in MLS was just $38 million – of which Beckham got $5 million himself.

    Today Inter Miami’s assessed club value is $1.02 bilion dollars, and the club has the best player in the world on its roster. Beckham’s stake in that club has not been publicly released but I’ve seen rumors it’s around 25% after the Mas brothers bought out Marcelo Claure and Masayoshi San, the other two primary initial investors. Which means Beckham’s stake in that franchise is as high as $250 million. That stake is only going to increase in the future. They move into a billion-dollar stadium next year.

    Where else can anyone get anything even remotely like that?

    It’s a brilliant suggestion, IMHO. And now is absolutely the time to play that card and push our chips as a nation All In. The 2026 World Cup will without question be – along with the 1994 World Cup, which got us MLS – the single biggest event that has ever happened for American soccer. It is the biggest chance to raise the profile of American soccer to the public and the world we are likely to get in the next 30+ years.

    Now is the time to play every card we have. We have to have an elite coach going into the 2026 World Cup. And we have something to offer that can absolutely get one. Possibly even Jurgen Klopp. It isn’t a pipedream, not if we’re serious.

    Vacqui nailed it. There will never be a better time, and this moment for us may never come again. If ever there was a time to go big or go home, it’s right now.

    Reply
    • I am sorry you lost at David Beckham. He was given a franchise that took excess years to actually come to fruition. The franchise was not even mediocre at best. Then MLS bails him out and creates the biggest commodity to ever hit US soccer with Messi and his support staff. David Beckham is a brand who was replaced by a bigger more successful brand Beckham is not crunching numbers to get under the cap, searching transfer wires, sitting in on training sessions in French academies(yes, French they develop more talent then anybody ). He was gifted his current success because he took a risk to play in MLS.
      USMNT is red card away from still competing in Copa and growing as a team against top ten teams. Speculate all you want and be told what should be done this player pool is just not good enough or deep enough. That doesn’t mean you should not support the team and have expectations

      Reply
      • Beckham came to MLS in 2007. He retired in 2013. “Excess years to grow to fruition” in 11 years? The guy has a substantial stake now in a franchise that’s now worth a billion dollars and is growing like a weed. That doesn’t happen in three years. And sure, MLS goosed Miami to where it is now. So what? When you see 70K+ showing up for MLS games now, it was absolutely worth it.

        We are not going to win the 2026 World Cup, with Klopp or without him. As you pointed out, we are not good enough, no argument…not yet and not for awhile. But we do have to go a ways and show we can at least compete in it, and we absolutely cannot crash out of Group the way we just did.

        Getting the best coach in the world makes our odds of succeeding at that just a whole lot better. And we do have something that could well entice him. I know if somebody offered me an MLS franchise and a chance to build a billion-dollar club from the ground up, it’d be real hard to say “no”.

        Why wouldn’t we at least try?

      • Tmr,

        “USMNT is red card away from still competing in Copa and growing as a team against top ten teams.”

        In fact, they got the red card.

        And now they are not competing or growing.
        And the confidence in everyone involved , everyone, is damaged.

        Team psychology is a delicate thing. I agree with you, no red card and things might look pretty good going into 2026.

        BUT

        the red card did happen and the team you were referring to were damaged PERMANENTLY. Gregg or whoever might replace him have got a lot to fix before 2026.

        ” Speculate all you want and be told what should be done this player pool is just not good enough or deep enough. That doesn’t mean you should not support the team and have expectations”

        Most everyone here supports the team.
        And while they may not be the same as yours, we all have expectations.

        But, in terms of expectations, I’ll just put this quote that I stole from the internet out there:

        “When to Walk Away

        The sunk cost fallacy is a cognitive bias that makes you feel as if you should continue pouring money, time, or effort into a situation since you’ve already “sunk” so much into it already. This perceived sunk cost makes it difficult to walk away from the situation since you don’t want to see your resources wasted.

        When falling prey to sunk cost fallacy, “the impact of loss feels worse than the prospect of gain, so we keep making decisions based on past costs instead of future costs and benefits,” explains Yalda Safai, MD, MPH is a psychiatrist in New York City.

        According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), this leads to irrational, emotion-based decision making, causing you to spend additional resources on a dead end instead of walking away from the situation that’s no longer serving you. ”

        To me that ‘s where the USMNT is now. Six years of sunken costs. this is not just about Gregg. It’s about everyone involved.

        This is the proverbial wake up call.

        2026 is calling.

        Now what?

    • Quozzel,

      In theory, an interesting suggestion…in reality, not sure it works.

      US Soccer is the entity overseeing the USMT and the process for selecting the next Head Coach. MLS is the entity overseeing the ownership of franchises in their league.

      Why would MLS give a potential Head Coach an option to buy / own a franchise in their league ( read: giving away equity ) to help secure a specific coach for the USMNT?

      MLS giving Beckham an option to buy / own a franchise makes perfect sense…it elevates the visibility of MLS’s brand, and in doing so, increases the value of said brand. That is a standard business practice…investing in your own business to increase sales / value.

      MLS has long been able to stand on it’s own two feet. They don’t need to invest in US Soccer to increase the value of their own brand.

      Giving away equity to another company ( read: USMNT ), or another company’s employee ( read: Klopp or Zizzou)?…how does that help MLS?

      Reply
      • In a word: profile.

        At the end of the day this is not about MLS or the USSF, this is about the status of soccer in the US versus baseball, basketball, football, and every other sport in an incredibly crowded market.

        This upcoming World Cup will play a massive part in shaping public opinion – and interest – in the sport itself for probably at least the next 32 years…that being the length between the last World Cup on US soil and this one.

        We can’t mess it up like we just did at Copa. We just can’t.

        How many times have you heard the tired old refrain from foreigners and even our own talking heads: “America will never be good at soccer”? I myself have lost count.

        The way to challenge that is to show we’re good at soccer. Flash and spectacle can buy eyeballs on you, yeah, but to keep those eyeballs there for any length of time there also has to be product.

        The biggest, flashiest spectacle in the world is about to land in the US in two years. And we have to make sure there’s a product there for people to see and to capture their lasting interest, otherwise we’re just another Qatar or South Africa, and when the party’s over, all public interest goes with it too.

      • PG,

        There is precedent for MLS involvement with National Team management:

        “Last week’s press release revealed Marsch would be “formally titled as the MLS Canada Men’s National Team Head Coach” after the owners of the country’s MLS clubs in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal had opened their wallets to cover a salary Canada Soccer, operating at a $4m deficit this year, wouldn’t otherwise have been able to afford. Reports say the three clubs are pitching in upwards of $1.5m. The arrangement is novel, potentially troublesome.”

        My Beckham/Klopp proposal is obviously a little different but MLS has long had a formal relationship with the USSF since Don Garber is on the Board of Directors of the USSF. Don and I we don’t talk but it would not be surprising if MLS had a big say with the USSF.

      • V: it’s an interesting idea and one i could see happening 10-20 years ago, when the league seemed more tied into NT success and there were fewer cats to herd. but in recent years you have a lot more MLS teams and several are turning down age group or non-window senior team callups.

        but that or some sort of sponsor-linkup would strike me as a way to circumvent the fed saying we only have so much in our charity for this. personally i’d think the bigger winner is you sit down with nike or someone like that, already part of our circle, and the candidate, and you hash something out where they agree to do some interviews, and tv and online/print ads and be an extension of the sponsorship universe, and then nike or whoever kicks in the extra cash to make some sort of $5-10m type compensation happen. so klopp or whoever is “nike” as well.

        i am sure some candidates would only want money but there have to be some who would like the mix of a top 16 team already — as a mess they can help fix — and being the host and center of attention.

        and all due respect to the naysayers or depressed but SAF once coached scotland to a grand total of 1 point at mexico 86, out in the groups, and that’s not even a divot on his overall legacy. it’s an opportunity, a 48 team world cup may have a more forgiving group stage, and worst case they circle back to the nihilists’ blaming of what they were handed. if klopp can’t improve on GB that probably boomerangs back on the players and doesn’t hurt him getting hired next place. at least as long as he doesn’t lose there too……

    • I was reading about the new San Diego club, still in formation. The club is mostly owned by a billionaire from Egypt. The current franchise fee to MLS to get a club is now $500 million. I think it was $100 million when Beckham and his group got the Miami franchise. Would MLS waive or reduce its franchise fee when all the other teams are the beneficiaries of that entry fee? Would Klopp or any other future coach be able to put together $500 million or a team that puts up $500 million? I just don’t see how this could be worked out unless the coach has a major backer who would want to back the coach and form a partnership. Other methods are much more practical, it seems to me.

      Reply
      • I don’t think the league would have to waive anything. Beckham didn’t wind up the majority owner of Inter Miami, just with a substantial stake in it, because he didn’t have that kind of money to sink in but the Mas brothers and the other two investors did.

        Basically, it’s just stock. You give Klopp 100 shares, each representing the right to buy 1% of the franchise. Then he sells a chunk of those off to the highest bidder (or the bidder he feels the most comfortable going into business with), and he re-applies that towards the franchise fee, and the investor then comes up with the rest. It’d take a truly sharp bargain to retain controlling interest in the franchise – Beckham couldn’t – but he’ll still wind up with a major stake and can certainly deal himself into the club in any capacity he chooses, and he’d certainly wind up the guy in charge of soccer decisions in the club because who are you going to get that’s better?

        We’ve seen it work once. I mean, that is Lionel Messi and some of the better Barca guys from the last 10+ years trotting around on a field in Fort Lauderdale right now, playing in MLS.

  20. In addition to Wilfried Nancy, Columbus Crew and Steve Cherundolo, LAFC, I was reading this article that listed a few more
    REALISTIC options:

    Jim Curtin, 45, Philadelphia Union
    Why it makes sense:
    The second-longest-tenured coach in MLS and is one of the best. Philadelphia is a team based on structure, tactics and fundamental soccer principles. Maybe, after so long a tenure, it’s the perfect time to try something new??? He’s coached current national teamers, including Brenden Aaronson and Mark McKenzie..

    David Wagner, 52, unattached
    Why it makes sense:
    The German-born former USMNT player has coached teams in the Bundesliga, Premier League, Champions League and in England’s second tier. He worked with McKennie (Schalke) and Josh Sargent (Norwich City)…..aaaaaannnndddd he was Klopp’s top assistant (Borussia Dortmund)

    Nancy (so maybe he can get Nagbe to play , lol), Cherundolo, Wagner, and Curtin should be out lifeline. Maybe even get an assistant National Team Coach out of the group???? Ok that’s wishful thinking lol. We already lost Jesse Marsch…..WE NEED TO GET ON THE BALL with this

    Reply
  21. 1)- Tab Ramos, the most successful U20 coach will get the most out this group
    2)- Hugo Perez, the 2nd most successful youth coach, U-14 or U-15, will get the most out of this group. Hugo will make CP the focal point like Hugo did when he coached the U.S. at the teenage level. The best athletes to support & cover for CPs deficiency. Keeping the CP will “save us” theme going
    3)- Jim Curtin, history -record w/ Philly is good enough; coached a mix of former USMNT players adults & youths at the Union
    4)- Wilfried Nancy, I like the in game management he’s shown, yet he’s only has 1-2 left footed players, on all his squads, exactly like GB; similar coaching style
    5)- No foreign coaches; no country has ever won a major tournament without having a coach born or raised in its country. I don’t need to smoke crack a thousand times to see if has health benefits. “It can happen one time!” type people are always the opposite of smart. We have about 100 years worth of evidence and people say “It can happen once!”
    6)- Stevie C isn’t ready

    Reply
    • The foreign manager thing is true, but the 8 countries that have won are also traditional soccer powers that have a huge pool of managers. England and Uruguay that haven’t won in forever try foreigners from time to time but the others wouldn’t even consider it. 2. That probably also shows we aren’t winning anyway because you need 100 years to build your program, so hire the best manager wherever they’re from and get the farthest you can and build the popularity of the sport.

      Reply
    • There is a country that made very impressive strides between one world cup and the next with a foreign coach: the USA. Bora Milutinovic of Serbia took a 1990 team made up of college boys and league 2 professionals and made it to the second and a credible 1-0 loss to eventual WC winner Brazil in 1994.

      Reply
    • No nation outside Europe and South America has won, should they deem it impossible and stop trying? The U.S.A. has never won a World Cup, since its never happened does that make it the opposite of smart to think it can happen? These things are true until they are not. We’re not going to be winning the World Cup this cycle or any trying to paint by numbers, duplicate the exact formula past winners have used because we are nothing like past winners. They are all very different from us- well established footballing nations with the culture, infrastructure, and large pool of top managers etc. You have to learn from them where it applies, but also think outside the box, use the right tool for the unique job of propelling our distinct nation/situation up a few levels. Guess what- we simply don’t have the right tool for the job in our toolbox and need to have the strength, pragmatism and humility to get the best available. That’s not taking a crazy leap- its more like common sense.

      Reply
      • I’ll add- stats can be used in many ways to pitch a viewpoint. Fact: No American has managed a World Cup winner, but a German has, an Argentine has, a Frenchman… that’s at least a step closer to a statistical advantage. Cheers brother

  22. If I was in charge of the federation of idiots, the first thing I’d do (after firing everyone) is go ask David Beckham for his advice. Then ask for his help in getting the person he recommends

    Reply
    • Remember David Beckham’s first choice was Phil Neville. His biggest accomplishment as a manager was winning the 2019 She Believes Cup.

      Reply
      • I don’t think he’d advise on someone just because he’s friends with them. I think he’d be a great sounding board for helping us choose, and then influence, a good choice.

      • What Beckham mostly has to offer is perspective.

        Beckham is intimately familiar with the “AMERICAN SOCCER scene from a variety of perspectives.
        He’s also still well connected with the Euro and the World SOCCER scene.
        Inter Miami, which I originally thought was the Miami light rail system, is doing well.

        It beats asking Alexi what he thinks.

        If it were me I’d just ask Beckham what his general perspective is on the situation and maybe run a couple of solutions by him. He’d probably have a better perspective on how guys like Klopp and Zizou ( who is allegedly close with Beckham) view the USMNT and whether trying to approach them make any sense.

        Individual coaches are always a gamble but the overall approach, the direction of the program, that’s more what I’d like to hear what Beckham has to say about it.

        Because the Copa exit is the equivalent of a car crash. We need to figure out if the vehicle is totaled or not. As someone else said, we need to look at setting something in place for beyond 2026.

      • @ Johnnyrazor LoL you took the words right out of my mouth re. Phil Neville. Beckham is more a glitzy PR, hype guy- he’d bring some bit of credibility with some I suppose, but don’t exactly see him as some kind of footballing mastermind to solve what ails us, thats for sure.

      • rico po

        “Beckham is more a glitzy PR, hype guy- he’d bring some bit of credibility with some I suppose, but don’t exactly see him as some kind of footballing mastermind to solve what ails us, thats for sure.”

        You don’t believe in getting good advice?
        Beckham is not a billionaire. He’s only worth about 450 million dollars. Besides Inter Miami he is co-owner of Salford City a small club.

        He’s no mastermind like Matt Crocker and his fellow geniuses at the USSF are.
        Those people are clearly fucking masterminds wouldn’t you agree?

        The main thing about Beckham is he knows both the contemporary American scene and the contemporary World scene pretty well. He knows American and Non-American players. And has done well. What they did at Inter Miami is pretty impressive.

        My suggestion is that they should talk to him and get his ideas.

        They’ll be lucky if he has time for those clowns.

        They could do and have done a lot worse. He won’t solve their problems but the USSF need an injection of something because they lack a lot.

      • V: “What they did at Inter Miami is pretty impressive.” we can’t get Messi to play for the US, nor can we get his friends Luis, Sergio, or Jordi. Beckham’s team was in last place before those players came. In their first four years they’ve made the playoffs once and lost that match 3-0. If they want to go after Zidane, who played with Becks, David could be helpful. But if it’s should we go get Herve Renard, David Wagner, Marcelo Gallardo I’m not sure how much knowledge he’ll have.
        ———————
        Salford City was bought by a bunch of ManU teammates of Beckham (including Phil Neville). They quickly climbed from 8th division to League Two (4th Div) but have been stuck in league 2 since 2019 when Beckham bought in. Basically they tried the Wrexham project before Wrexham and with less success. Maybe we should talk to Ryan and Rob too.

    • Johnnyrazor

      “V: “What they did at Inter Miami is pretty impressive.” we can’t get Messi to play for the US, nor can we get his friends Luis, Sergio, or Jordi. Beckham’s team was in last place before those players came. In their first four years they’ve made the playoffs once and lost that match 3-0. ”

      They are doing pretty good right now.

      “If they want to go after Zidane, who played with Becks, David could be helpful. But if it’s should we go get Herve Renard, David Wagner, Marcelo Gallardo I’m not sure how much knowledge he’ll have.”

      And you’ll never be sure unless you talk to the bastard. Do you have a problem with consulting with people who might actually know something useful?
      ———————
      “Salford City was bought by a bunch of ManU teammates of Beckham (including Phil Neville). They quickly climbed from 8th division to League Two (4th Div) but have been stuck in league 2 since 2019 when Beckham bought in. Basically they tried the Wrexham project before Wrexham and with less success. Maybe we should talk to Ryan and Rob too.”

      That couldn’t possibly hurt. I’m a little tired of ignorance and stupidity leading the way. Not to mention a total lack of PR awareness.

      If they do dump Gregg the next person has only one real objective, win as much as possible.

      Because that is the game in international football , get the points to advance by any means necessary. Gregg seems to have forgotten that part.

      Reply
  23. What about thinking out of the box.? Tony Gustavsson was USWNT assistant for many years, lead Australian women to 4th place finishes at Olympics and WC? Herve Reynard success with Zambia, Ivory Coast, and Saudi Arabia. Currently coaching French women. Why not Sarina Wiegman, 4 time FIFA women’s coach of the year, two WC 2nd places. Former North Carolina star Heel.

    Reply
  24. The US starting rotation is under 25 with the exception of Turner and Ream

    Turner GK not a starter at club level

    Scally, starter(replacement for injured Dest)

    Richard’s finished his season at Crystal Palace as starter

    Ream starter and captain at Fulham

    Robinson stater at Fulham (voted MVP of team)

    Adams, hurt must of his season at Bournemouth

    McKennie, starter at Juventus barely

    Musah, substitute role at AC Milan.

    Reyna, substitute role at Nottingham Forest. There on loan from Dortmund. Needs a new agent and needs heavy minutes and the key to USMNT success

    Balogun, spot starter at Monaco. Needs to be a 20 goal scorer at club level

    Pulisic , starter at AC Milan and first complete dominant season.

    These narratives of someone walking through the door and all of sudden the US has a dominant starting 11 and competent 18 is delusional. Can they improve over the next four years, absolutely. Have they shown improvement since WC questionable but certain aspects yes. Set pieces were threatening, Scally proved himself at international level, players play hard for each other and their coach.
    With this personal you cannot expect them to catch fire in a bottle over and over again in a tournament. A winning culture is just starting and competing at a top ten level is extremely hard, I repeat extremely hard with so many obstacles and cruelness of the game.
    I still see positive with the direction of this team whether Berhalter is coach or not but to quote Joe Namath, “ Miss America is not walking through that door!”

    Reply
  25. I think this is going to be a more difficult job of finding a new coach then what a lot think.

    I dont necessarily see this coaching job as desirable as some seem to think it is.

    Both Dolo and Nancy are in good situations. Why leave for two years? They are both in the hunt for trophies this season.

    Zidane was already approached he said no thank you.

    Klopp wants a couple of years of peace. And I wouldn’t be surprised if he has an eye on the Germany job after 2026.

    For me it seems far more likely to find a seasoned international style coach for two years who are free i.e. Low, Van Gaal (which would be funny), Felipe Scolari, Renard etc…

    Reply
    • 2tone

      “I think this is going to be a more difficult job of finding a new coach then what a lot of think.”

      A lot? Who is that? Y’all want Gregg gone but who has said finding an improvement on him will be easy peasey?

      “I dont necessarily see this coaching job as desirable as some seem to think it is.”

      Again “some”? Who are “some”?

      The evidence has long been out there that the USMNT manager job is not desirable to the big names and the up and coming managers.

      Since 1994 our permanent Managers have been:
      Sampson, Bruce, Bob, JK, Briefly Bruce, Gregg. Five guys in 30 years. Are you impressed? Does that list blow you away? When they were hired how many of them were hot shit commodities? JK was the most notorious but people were not beating down his door to get him. JK must be one hell of a negotiator.

      If I’m Klopp I ask, so why such humble managers for so long? What do they know that I do not? And why is it that none of them have gone on the greater success since leaving the USMNT? You can argue about Bob’s path. He proved he was a great person in Egypt. And JK had a brief affair recently with South Korea which was DOA before it began. But in general, having USMNT manager on your resume doesn’t seem to be a huge helpful career boost.

      It certainly might be an albatross around Gregg’s neck if they axe him.

      The money and players you say?

      Well, the money is here now, and they still went low rent with Gregg.
      And we had and still are seeing lots of promising young players. So, did they put them in the hands of a proven developer of young talents?

      A guy like Klopp for example? No, they didn’t.

      To me, the problem is the USSF itself. They are cheap and lazy.

      They don’t seem all that interested in having the best USMNT possible, playing attractively and winning things like a World Cup or a Copa America on the way. I’m sure they would love it if they did but the USSF seems more interested in having the appearance of a competitive team and likes the narrative of a brotherhood, us against the world kind of deal. I mean how many times do we have to hear how much these guys love each other and Gregg and would run through a brick wall and die for him? Jesus H. Christ. How about you leave the wall alone, stop blowing smoke up his butt, and win a big game for him? Gimme a frikin break. Talk is cheap. I’ll bet Gregg is embarrassed by the hyperbole.

      Antonio Brown was a scumbag and I’m sure everyone on the Steelers thought he was a dick but, during a game, he knew what to do to win.

      In other words, the USSF want a winning coach but first, he has to be affordable, a company guy, controllable, nice to MLS, and preferably American.

      Kind of hamstrings you a little.

      My completely uniformed and biased take is that the USMNT manager is not in a thoroughly professional environment where the only focus is on being the best you can be and on doing what it takes to win.

      Klopp looks like he had that in Liverpool but he won’t get that here. So why should he come? For any amount of money?

      I will say that if Klopp suddenly decided that this was the job he’s always wanted, they would find the financing and I’ll bet it wouldn’t be that hard. Get MLS to offer him a David Beckham type deal on a new expansion franchise. Klopp needs something new to do? How about ownership?

      Reply
      • Some equals media. A lot equals fans. Thought that was more simple to understand.

        Seems far more likely BrucecArena will be brought back then attracting Klopp.

      • 2tone,

        “Seems far more likely BrucecArena will be brought back then attracting Klopp.”

        If you’re going to bring Arena back, you might as well stick with Gregg. Couva was a bigger failure than this one. Much bigger. And you want to reward that c++ksucker? That will send a great message to everyone.

  26. I’ve seen a few lists like this now. I guess the sentiment is that there will soon be a vacancy. I hope so, but I am not so sure. The re-hiring was a very big shock and disappointment and I can imagine that is in the cards again.

    Also, other than click-bait, is there a reason to mention Klopp (other to say it can’t happen)? Do you think that he will take any new position this quickly? Do you think he adores Christian so much that he’d jump at the chance to coach him (because, if I recall correctly, Christian wasn’t really with the first team when Klopp was coach).

    Reply
    • “The re-hiring was a very big shock”

      No it wasn’t. You expect blackmail from a whiny brat’s mom to be a factor around someone getting fired? They had a passing grade at world cup and every player minus one loudly and proudly supported him.

      Disappointment? Ya that’s another story, and that’s been the case since day 1. But again, the notion that we can just magically have Klopp but-for GGG’s brother being corrupt is laughable. The realistic people on this list is…well…just a bunch more GGGs and a maybe a splash of not-quite-Klinsmann at best.

      Reply
      • Maybe not a big shock, but it was a surprise to me and disappointing. He certainly had not earned a second cycle (few should) and the hiring process had appeared to be thoughtful and thorough (based on results, it was not). Brats and decades old self-inflicted wounds seem to have not been a factor and I hadn’t expected they would be. I’m not sure why you appear to be bringing the first hiring into this, but please don’t elaborate.

    • Tim Howard did an interview saying he’d go get Klopp and if they’d give him the go ahead he’s got his swim trunks sun tan lotion ready to head to Spain and make his pitch. That’s were most the Klopp buzz is coming from.

      Reply
  27. For my money – focus on a coach who already has a proven track record in international soccer. Club soccer is very different and the transition not always that straightforward.

    Reply
  28. “The odds of U.S. Soccer having the funds to pay a manager like Klopp are slim”….you mean the odds for U.S Soccer to interest Klopp (with 2 years to go) are slim TO NONE.

    The possibility to get Zizou who seems to be patiently waiting for the France national team to call is virtually impossible.

    Steve Cherundolo and Wilfried Nancy are our best bet…..but they’ll be giving up a lot to drop what they are doing (with all the progress they’ve made with their respective teams) to get the National Team ready for a World Cup in 2 years.

    Lets see what happens.

    Reply

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